VMQ Example Script for Intel E5-2637v0 & one vSwitch

Following configuration is for an Intel Xeon E5-2637 and Intel X520 NICs.

The Script will disable VMQ on iSCSI and Livemigration and enable and configure VMQ on converged.

CPU distribution:

2

Script:

 

New Blogpost about Azure Backupserver @ Azure Community Deutschland

Hi everybody,

a few minutes ago my blogpost about Microsoft Azure Backup Server went only @ Azure Community Deutschland.

To read it please click here.

Azure Stack Technical Preview (POC): Hardware requirements – published

Hi everybody,

even with released date probably moved to Q4/2016 or somewhen 2017 Microsoft published more and more information about it’s new Azure Stack.

Yesterday they published the Hardware requirements for Azure Stack, which you can find on the original Blogpost here.


Source: http://blogs.technet.com/b/server-cloud/archive/2015/12/21/microsoft-azure-stack-hardware-requirements.aspx

Hardware requirements for Azure Stack Technical Preview (POC)

Note that these requirements only apply to the upcoming POC release, they may change for future releases.

Component

Minimum

Recommended

Compute: CPU Dual-Socket: 12 Physical Cores Dual-Socket: 16 Physical Cores
Compute: Memory 96 GB RAM 128 GB RAM
Compute: BIOS Hyper-V Enabled (with SLAT support) Hyper-V Enabled (with SLAT support)
Network: NIC Windows Server 2012 R2 Certification required for NIC; no specialized features required Windows Server 2012 R2 Certification required for NIC; no specialized features required
Disk drives: Operating System 1 OS disk with minimum of 200 GB available for system partition (SSD or HDD) 1 OS disk with minimum of 200 GB available for system partition (SSD or HDD)
Disk drives: General Azure Stack POC Data 4 disks. Each disk provides a minimum of 140 GB of capacity (SSD or HDD). 4 disks. Each disk provides a minimum of 250 GB of capacity.
HW logo certification Certified for Windows Server 2012 R2

Storage considerations

Data disk drive configuration: All data drives must be of the same type (SAS or SATA) and capacity.  If SAS disk drives are used, the disk drives must be attached via a single path (no MPIO, multi-path support is provided)
HBA configuration options:
     1. (Preferred) Simple HBA
2. RAID HBA – Adapter must be configured in “pass through” mode
3. RAID HBA – Disks should be configured as Single-Disk, RAID-0
Supported bus and media type combinations

  •          SATA HDD
  •          SAS HDD
  •          RAID HDD
  •          RAID SSD (If the media type is unspecified/unknown*)
  •          SATA SSD + SATA HDD**
  •          SAS SSD + SAS HDD**

* RAID controllers without pass-through capability can’t recognize the media type. Such controllers will mark both HDD and SSD as Unspecified. In that case, the SSD will be used as persistent storage instead of caching devices. Therefore, you can deploy the Microsoft Azure Stack POC on those SSDs.

** For tiered storage, you must have at least 3 HDDs.

Example HBAs: LSI 9207-8i, LSI-9300-8i, or LSI-9265-8i in pass-through mode

 

While the above configuration is generic enough that many servers should fit the description, we recommend a couple of SKUs: Dell R630 and the HPE DL 360 Gen 9. Both these SKUs have been in-market for some time.

Dell Blog – Remotely Configure System Settings for Guarded Fabric Host Deployment in Windows Server 2016

Hi Everybody,

Dell published a blog on it’s TechCenter how to remotly configure Guarded Fabric on it’s Generation 13 Servers.

Check it out here.  🙂

How to fix same SMBIOS ID on different Hosts

Today one post about things I see sometimes in the field.

Today I want to show you how to fix the issue when you get servers and clients with the same SMBIOS ID. Normally that would be an issue but as soon as you try to management them with System Center Virtual Machine Manager or Configuration Manager it will become one. Both tools use the SMBIOS ID to create a primary key in their databases to identify the system.

2015-11-29_14-02-03

 

Currently I only know the following trick to fix the issue and that one would be extremly annoying on many clients or servers but it actually work.

First you need two tools.

1: Rufus – To create a bootable USB Stick

2: AMIDMI – With that tool you can overright the SMBIOS ID

Now create the Bootstick with Rufus and copy the AMIDMI file on the stick.

Reboot your from the stick.

Navigate to the folder with your AMIDMI file and run the command amidmi /u

Afterwards you can reboot the system and start Windows again.

 

When you are working with Virtual Machine Manager, you need to remove the host from your management consolte and add it again. After the host is discovered again, you can see the new SMBIOS ID.

2015-11-29_14-02-50

 

I currently saw these issues with following motherboard vendors:

  1. ASRock (Client & Rack)
  2. ASUS (Client)
  3. SuperMicro (Server & ARM)
  4. Fujisu (Server)